April 24, 2014

SOTT Draft Profile: Brock Osweiler

Brock Osweiler

The next few weeks here on State of the Texans we will be doing some draft profiles of some particular players who could possibly fit into the Texans plans. We are not going to try to piece together scouting reports, but we enlist help of bloggers who actually cover the respective player and their school.

 

In this installment we look at the first quarterback of our series, Arizona State’s Junior signal caller Brock Osweiler. At 6’7″ and 242 lbs. he fits the bill for the big tall quarterback that NFL teams look for. Hampered by a mid foot sprain Osweiler did not participate in the drill at the NFL combine, and is on the outside looking in on the top 5 quarterbacks in the draft. He is a mystery to scouts, especially with the offense he ran for the Sun Devils.

We talk to Brad Denny of House of Sparky, a blog dedicated to the Sun Devils on SB Nation. He helps us find out more about this later round draft pick in Osweiler.

 

Can you give us some background on Osweiler?

Brock Osweiler came to ASU in 2009 and made one start as a true freshman, but was injured early in that game against Oregon. He battled Steven Threet during the offseason for the starting quarterback job, losing in close race. While Threet’s interceptions piled up, Osweiler waited for his chance. He finally got his break when Threet was injured against UCLA, and Osweiler produced five total touchdowns in the comeback win, and later led a dramatic win over arch-rival Arizona.

He entered 2011 as the unquestioned starter, and played very well for the most part. He was expected to be one of the top quarterbacks in the nation in 2012, but his surprise decision to enter the NFL Draft ended that.

 

Is he making a mistake coming out early?

The initial reaction was that he was, but his rapid ascent up many draft boards is starting to make his decision seem wise.

Osweiler has outstanding physical tools and some very good intangibles, but is raw in many aspects, having just 14 career starts. Regardless, with many projections already having him as a borderline first round pick, a solid lead up to the draft could make it impossible to argue with his choice to leave early.

 

What are his strengths and weaknesses?

Osweiler has excellent size for the position, standing at 6’6 7/8” and 242 pounds. Despite that size, he is very athletic and has Ben Roethlisberger-like mobility. He has excellent arm strength and can make many NFL-caliber throws. Perhaps his greatest praise has been for his leadership qualities. He became the unquestioned leader of not just the offense, but the entire team and was the de-facto face of the program.

He still has a lot of work to do in order to become an NFL starter. Osweiler’s throwing motion is more of a three-quarters delivery, something that is partially offset by his height, but still an issue coaches will want to address. His accuracy waned as the season progressed, and he often is inconsistent with his reads.

 

Did the Sun Devils offense help or hurt Oswieler?

It’s hard to say that the scheme hurt Osweiler, as he set several school records such as passing yards, completions and completion-percentage.

Yet, the play calling didn’t suit Osweiler’s strengths particularly well. As any ASU fan will tell you, the team relied heavily on swing passes and quick screens. This negated the powerful arm that a gunslinger-type quarterback like Osweiler offered. With so many quick passes called, Osweiler’s reads never progressed significantly, something that will require a lot of work in the NFL.

 

How do you see Osweiler at the NFL level?

Osweiler has all of the tools necessary to become a quality NFL starting quarterback. His combination of size, mobility and intelligence align very well for future success.

However, he shouldn’t be counted on to contribute right away. If he can enter a situation where he can learn for two seasons behind a capable veteran, he can take the reins successfully. Ideally, he will not be in a West Coast scheme, and instead be in an offense that will allow him to throw strikes downfield.

 

You can follow Brad for all of your Arizona State Sun Devils news on twitter.

 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: